New York City is a Sanctuary for bedbugs and Illegal aliens

It’s official!, only middle class , white western people bring bedbugs to the United States. Immigrants and Illegal aliens are a protected class in this debate and you will be labeled a racist if you even mention the possibility that Bedbugs and incurable TB and Leprosy arrived in the same suitcase or taco truck so to speak. Of course who has the most bedbugs? New York City! Lots of travelers and Illegals and immigrants, so let’s just say the travelers are to blame unless they are foreigners and then its the White Mid_Western Tourists who are to blame. T

Its the foreigners (esp illegal or “undocumented” aliens) who brought the bedbugs in.

Illegal aliens are an issue concerning  bedbugs. It costs a fortune to remove them , something I doubt Illegals will spend money on, since they send so much money home in the form of remittances. Fine if the gringos ponies up the money , otherwise no su beg bug, mi bed bug.

when landlords (such as a large slumlord company in Boston did) simply move to have tenants who have bedbugs –and are here illegally — deported

NY is “sanctuary city” thanks to Bloomberg? WHAT A POS! I sincerely hope the bedbugs find their way into Bloomberg’s apartment and crawl into his bed. 

04-24-2011

Hi folks,

We last lived in NYC in 2008, and had a brush with bedbugs in 2005. From what I’ve read, the bugs are becoming more and more inescapable. When we last lived there, you could catch the bugs from a neighbor or a friend’s house; now it sounds like they are spreading to public schools, movie theatres, subway station benches, clothing stores, and offices.

If we move back to NYC, what do you think are our chances of catching bedbugs? Will we have to bag our clothes in plastic at the end of every day and boil them upon entry to our house?

[+] Rate this post positively

 

04-18-2011, 09:04 AM 

I think it really depends on the building. I thought I had heard that 1 in 10 adults in NY has had some direct experience with bedbugs in the home, but I can’t find that statistic now. Also if that really were true, that probably includes everyone who did have bedbugs and no longer does.

Some buildings, if they are badly infested, probably have a much higher rate than 10%. Other buildings will have zero. My own building had two infestations that I know of a few years ago and they were eradicated. I was extremely paranoid for awhile, and did take certain precautions. But I am not taking any anymore, except that I never take anything from the trash, don’t buy anything used and only use light-colored bedding (in order to spot an infestation early if there were one).

.

Perhaps you could rent in a coop building where mostly owner-shareholders live. That way at least you would be living with neighbors who care about and maintain their units because they want to protect their investment.

 

Checking bedbug registry as a good place to start:

Bed Bug Registry – Check Apartments and Hotels Across North America

Most of the time if a building has a problem, they get reported to the registry pretty quick. Bedbugs have been reported in Times Square movie theaters as recently as last summer so they do occasionally get into public places.

Used furniture is a bad idea these days. Used clothes or linens should be washed and dried and you’re good. (The heat of a clothes dryer on normal/high heat is more than enough to kill them.)

 

 

 

, 07:43 PM 

Its the foreigners (esp illegal or “undocumented” aliens) who brought the begbugs in.

NY is “sanctuary city” thanks to Bloomberg? WHAT A POS! I sincerely hope the bedbugs find their way into Bloomberg’s apartment and crawl into his bed.

I read in the paper the other day that Bloomberg’s residence has a load of safety violations. Maybe bedbugs are next?

Let us hope.

[+ 

 

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/forum/new-york-city/1256319-chance-bedbugs-apartments-rent-coop.html#ixzz1TTVYRqnN

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